The 4th Southeast Asian

Indigenous Psychology

Conference (SEAIP 2024)

6th & 7th December 2024










The 4th Southeast Asian

Indigenous Psychology

Conference (SEAIP 2024)

6th & 7th December 2024



HISTORY & GOALS

Indigenous Psychology (IP) delves into the influence of culture and social processes on individuals’ inner psychological mechanisms, cognition, and behaviors, transcending the confines of Western psychology. Unfortunately, Southeast Asian psychology has remained inadequately represented in mainstream psychology, sidelining indigenous ways of understanding.

 

SEAIP aspires to gather scholars from around the world to empower local psychologists in the SEA regions, enabling them to conduct research that is both indigenous and culturally relevant. This endeavor aims to broaden the scope of global psychological research. Additionally, our aim is to incorporate underrepresented psychologists from less-developed countries within SEA regions, amplifying their voices and concerns to foster a more equitable global psychology landscape.

 

Inaugurated virtually in 2021 by Monash University Malaysia’s Culture and Health Lab, in collaboration with AASP (The Asian Association of Social Psychology), the first SEAIP meeting featured two keynote speakers and seven plenary speakers with extensive IP backgrounds. This two-day event attracted approximately 100 abstract submissions from 16 countries, resulting in the acceptance of 16 abstracts for presentation. Distinguished Early Career Researchers were awarded up to USD $600 for the top three outstanding full papers, while two seed grants worth over USD $2000 were granted to two of the four research clusters established during the conference.

 

In 2022, the second SEAIP embraced the theme “Translating Research into Mental Health Interventions within Indigenous Communities.” This meeting aimed to empower local psychologists in the SEA regions to (i) conduct culturally relevant indigenous research and (ii) translate research outcomes into community engagement and mental health interventions, particularly for marginalized indigenous groups. By amplifying the voices of both SEA researchers and indigenous communities, this effort aspires to foster a more balanced global psychology landscape.

 

In the year 2023, we launched the 3rd Southeast Asian Indigenous Psychology Conference with the theme “Building Thriving Communities from an Indigenous Psychology Perspective: Research, Services, and Policy Making”. This conference was scheduled for November 25th and 26th and was held at the Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Hasanuddin, Indonesia, as well as virtually through Zoom Cloud.

SEAIP-2024 HIGHLIGHTS

For the year 2024, we are happy to announce our 4th Southeast Asian Indigenous Psychology Conference (SEAIP-2024) based on the theme ‘Constructing Identity of Indigenous Psychologies in Southeast Asia’. Sponsored by AASP, the SEAIP-2024 conference is being co-hosted by the University of the Philippines Baguio, Pambansang Samahan sa Sikolohiyang Pilipino (PSSP), the Southeast Asian Indigenous Psychology (SEAIP) network, and Monash Malaysia Culture and Health Lab.

 

SEAIP-2024 is a continuation of our efforts to empower young scholars in the Southeast Asian region who are interested in indigenous psychologies by building a community in which collaborative efforts and multidisciplinary research on culturally relevant issues may be fostered and supported. As such, this scientific meeting includes plenty of opportunities for dialogue, networking and collaboration, including:

 
(1) an open-session with keynote speaker, Professor Grace H. Aguiling Dalisay, and two plenary speakers, Professor Jose Antonio R. Clemente and Professor Carl Martin Allwood;
 
(2) half-day closed cluster meetings for a maximum of 50 registrants, where participants from these cluster sessions will have the opportunity to apply for a SEAIP research seed grant (there are two research seed grants available with 2500 USD per grant); and
 
(3) two research paper presentation sessions from successful registrants for the abstract submission in which the 10 best student presenters would be awarded two-year AASP memberships.

LONG TERM GOALS 

  1. Empowering emerging scholars in the field of “indigenous psychology” across SEA
  2. Addressing culturally pertinent issues in SEA through the methodology of IP research
  3. Uncovering the indigenous knowledge upheld by populations and minorities in the SEA region
  4. Establishing a research hub for collaborative and multidisciplinary IP research within SEA

Conference dates:

6th & 7th December 2024

Conference time:

8.00am - 5.00pm (UTC +8)

Conference venue:

Zoom (details to be advised) & University of the Philippines Baguio campus

Registration Details

Start: July 1st, 2024
End: November 1st, 2024

 

THEME

Constructing Identity of Indigenous Psychologies in Southeast Asia

OBJECTIVES: 

(1) Explore the identities of indigenous psychologies in Southeast Asia

 

(2) Find common grounds between indigenous psychologies and other cross-cultural psychological sciences

 

(3) Apply indigenous psychologies sciences into Indigenous communities and marginalized populations

 

(4) Build research collaboration through cluster network and seed grant application

 

(5) Raise awareness among younger scholars on the importance of indigenous psychologies through paper presentation sessions

 
 

INVITED SPEAKERS

KEYNOTE SPEAKER

Professor Grace H. Aguiling-Dalisay, Ph.D. (University of the Philippines, Diliman)


"Future of Indigenous Psychologies"

SPEAKER BACKGROUND

AGUILING-DALISAY, GRACE H.

Grace H. Aguiling-Dalisay , PhD, RPsy is an Educator, Volunteerism Advocate   and a licensed Psychologist trained in the areas of Developmental and Philippine Psychology at the University of the Philippines. She completed her pre-doctoral program at the Bank Street College of Education in New York, New York and has a Professional Diploma in Family Ministries from the Center for Family Ministries, Loyola School of Theology, Ateneo de Manila University.

She has spent most of her professional life in the academe as Professor of Psychology specializing in child and adolescent development, life-span social and emotional development, Sikolohiyang Pilipino, social responsibility, research and research ethics. 

Dr. Aguiling-Dalisay has served in executive management and governance capacities in organizations devoted to education and social transformation. Among others, she was Research Director of the Philippine Sesame Street Project, Philippine Director of the International Project on Children in Crisis of the Children’s Rehabilitation Center, and Research Direction Consultant of the Bridging Leadership Program at the Asian Institute of Management. She was President of the Pambansang Samahan sa  Sikolohiyang Pilipino (National Association for Philippine Psychology ), the Philippine Association for the Gifted , the Philippine Psychology Research and Training House and is Founding President of the Philippine Network of VOICE Volunteers ( VOICE Network). She served as Governing Council Member of the Philippine Social Science Council and was Core Group Member of the ASEAN University Network University Social Responsibility and Sustainability. She is Editor of  “The Pahinungod Reader”, a book on University Volunteerism and is primary author of the book “Extending the Self: Volunteerism as Pakikipagkapwa”.

Currently, she is Vice-Chair for Basic Education, Education Committee of the Management Association of the Philippines and Chair of the Board of Trustees of ChildFund Philippines, a non-profit dedicated to helping Filipino children grow up healthy, educated, skilled and safe.

She is President and CEO of the Center for Educational Measurement, a non-profit pioneer and leading provider of standardized assessments in the Philippines since 1978.

Dr. Grace is an Amazing Alumni Achiever Awardee of the Maryknoll Miriam College Alumni Association. 

SUMMARY OF SPEECH

The cross-indigenous perspective is an integral part of the process toward Global Psychology. As introduced by Virgilio Enriquez, this model draws knowledge from the different cultures of the world to contribute to a shared understanding of life and human behavior. Here, each culture is an indigenous source of knowledge as contrasted against the kind of cross-cultural Psychology where non-dominant source cultures are mere recipients of knowledge from a dominant source culture. The cross-indigenous perspective calls for a multi-method and multi-language methodology and the “total approach” as espoused by Alfredo Lagmay where the scientific study of psychology involves the totality of the human being, including human values.

Two studies with Filipino culture as source and their contribution to global psychology will be shared. These are in the thematic areas of volunteerism and social emotional learning (SEL). Both were undertaken with Filipinos as participants and researchers, and conducted in the language of the participants. The research on volunteerism explicitly used the framework and methods of Sikolohiyang Pilipino.

PLENARY SPEAKER 1

Professor Jose Antonio R. Clemente, Ph.D., (University of the Philippines, Diliman)


"Indigenous Psychologies and Community: How Indigenous psychology could bring healing and hope to marginalized communities in Southeast Asia"

SPEAKER BACKGROUND

JOSE ANTONIO R. CLEMENTE, PhD

Ton Clemente is a Professor at the Department of Psychology, University of the Philippines Diliman and is currently an Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs (Faculty Development) of the UP System. He completed his PhD in Psychology at the University of Macau. He considers himself a scholar-advocate of Social and Indigenous Psychology. His research interests include the social psychology of social class and inequality, LGBTQ psychology, cultural values, living wage, and the role of traditional and new media in education and in improving quality of life. He is a lifetime member and former President (2020-2022) of the Pambansang Samahan sa Sikolohiyang Pilipino.

SUMMARY OF SPEECH

What makes life good and meaningful? Some human development scholars characterize a good life as a dignified life (e.g., Nussbaum, 2011). A meaningful life, additionally, may be construed as living in accordance with what one values, based on one’s own terms (e.g., Enriquez, 1986). Historically marginalized communities, however, have often lived with restricted opportunities and unjust systems—a life that no one deserves. In this presentation, I propose that one way of advancing the well- being of marginalized communities is by employing a cultural framework of the indigenous concept of the good life. This entails asking community members what they value, identifying the gaps in their pursuit of what is valued, and creating systems that support such pursuit. I argue that in addition to the deficit models that pervade research on marginalized groups, this proposition places a high premium on agency to choose, capabilities to attain, and enablers of a good life. I will describe the ingredients of a magandang buhay (good life), a well-being framework in the Philippines that has been employed in studies on precarious workers and stigmatized sexual minorities. I contend that this framework, although context-specific, may also be adapted by other Southeast Asian societies. In closing, I will attempt to forward the enduring commitments of cultural, critical, and decolonial paradigms that indigenous psychologies may wish to embrace in facilitating communities’ pursuit of healing and hope.

PLENARY SPEAKER 2

Professor Carl Martin Allwood, Ph.D., (University of the Gothenburg, Sweden)

"Identity of Indigenous Psychologies: Indigenous psychologies vs ICP (Indigenous communities psychology) vs Cultural Psychology, same or different?"

SPEAKER BACKGROUND

CARL MARTIN ALLWOOD Ph.d

Carl Martin Allwood is professor em of psychology at the Department of psychology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. Before professor in Gothenburg, he was (1998-2008) professor of psychology at Lund University, Sweden. His research interests are in culture-oriented psychology, anthropology of knowledge, theory of science, social cognitive psychology and judgment and decision making in different social contexts. He has studied and written about the indigenous psychologies for the last 25 years. He has published over 100 papers in international scientific journals in different areas of psychology and has written many book chapters and edited several books. He was guest researcher at Carnegie-Mellon University, Pittsburgh, USA, in 1979 and at University of California at San Diego, USA in 1980. For shorter periods he was guest researcher at NISTADS, New Delhi, India, and at the School of Management, Zeijiang University, China, both in 2005.

Some of his works on indigenous psychology are:

  • Allwood, C.M. (1998). The creation and nature(s) of indigenized psychologies from the perspective of the anthropology of knowledge. In S. Gorenstein (Ed.), Knowledge and society, Vol 11 (pp. 153-172). Greenwich, Conn: Jai Press Inc.
  • Allwood, C.M. (2011). On the foundation of the indigenous psychologies. Social Epistemology, 25(1), 3–14.
  • Allwood, C.M. (2018). The nature and challenges of indigenous psychologies. Cambridge Elements series. Cambridge UK: Cambridge University Press.Allwood, C.M. (2019). Future prospects for indigenous psychologies. The Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology, 39(2), 90–97.
  • Allwood, C.M. (2020). Yang’s global psychology and beyond. In L. Sundararajan, K. K. Hwang, & K.-H. Yeh (Eds.), Global Psychology from indigenous perspectives Visions inspired by K. S. Yang (pp. 111-128).  Cham, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan.

SUMMARY OF SPEECH

Two central assumptions in the IPs are that psychological research should be scientific and be based on the culture of the researched society. This should pertain as much as possible to the whole research process: concepts, theories, methods, and phenomena studied.

The presentation will discuss different forms of IPs, their development and use. First, the concept of “identity” is discussed. Possible positive and negative consequences of identifying with assumed identities will be noted. Next, given the importance of culture for the IPs, some versions of the concept of “culture” are reviewed.   

Then I discuss the “Indigenous communities psychology” and “Cultural Psychology” in relation to the indigenous psychologies as such. Here the historical development and other important features of these versions will be attended to. Both of these IPs tend to use the culture concept in a sociologically oriented, fairly abstract, and external way, and this take will, for each version, be contrasted with the pros and cons of utilizing other types of culture concepts.

IP research is to be based on the researched society’s culture, including its epistemology. Using two indigenous epistemologies (from the Jains in India and the Pirahã in Brazil) as illustration, I finally discuss some challenges with this ambition and at the same time keeping the IPs “scientific”. 

CONFERENCE PROGRAM

ABOUT US

SPONSOR

Asian Association of Social Psychology

ORGANIZING COMMITTEE

SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE

ORGANIZING COMMITTEE

CHAIR: Dr. Rozel Balmores-Paulino

(Department of Anthropology, Sociology and Psychology, University of the Philippines Baguio)

CO-CHAIR: Associate Professor Jay A. Yacat

(Department of Psychology, University of the Philippines, Diliman)

Assistant Professor Maria Ana B. Diaz

(Department of Anthropology, Sociology and Psychology,
University of the Philippines Baguio)

Dr. Myreen P. Cleofe

(University of Santo Tomas, Philippines)

Mr. Aron Harold G. Pamoso

(PhD candidate of Australian National University)

Ms. Maireen Joy N. Perez

(Guidance Counselor, University of Santo Tomas, Philippines)

Dr. Maria Theresa B. Gallardo

(University of Santo Tomas, Philippines)

Mr. Joselito Banono Jr.

(Assistant Professor, Cebu Institute of Technology, Philippines)

Ms. Ker Rou Chung

(Research Assistant, Monash University Malaysia)

Ms. Syurawasti Muhiddin

(Psychology Study Program, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Hasanuddin)

SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE

CHAIR: Dr. Rachel Sing-Kiat Ting

(Adjunct Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, Jeffrey Cheah
School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Monash University Malaysia)

Dr. Andrian Liem

(Research Fellow, Jeffrey Cheah School of Medicine
and Health Sciences, Monash University Malaysia)

Dr. Elizabeth Jones

(Head of Department of Psychology, Jeffrey Cheah
School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Monash University Malaysia)

Dr. Wenty Marina Minza

(Faculty of Psychology, Universitas Gadjah Mada)

Dr. Kyle Tan

(Research Fellow, Faculty of Māori and Indigenous
Studies, University of Waikato)

Dr. Angela Oktavia Suryani

(Assistant Professor, Universitas Katolik Indonesia Atma Jaya)

Dr. Joy R. Tungol

(Associate Professor, Department of Psychology,
University of Santo Tomas)

Dr. Rachana Bhangaokar

(Assistant Professor, The Maharaja Sayajirao
University of Baroda)

Dr. Justine Thong

(HELP University)

CHAIR: Dr. Rozel Balmores-Paulino

(Department of Anthropology, Sociology and Psychology, University of the Philippines Baguio)

CHAIR: Dr. Rachel Sing-Kiat Ting

(Adjunct Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, Jeffrey Cheah
School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Monash University Malaysia)

CO-CHAIR: Associate Professor Jay A. Yacat

(Department of Psychology, University of the Philippines, Diliman)

Dr. Andrian Liem

(Research Fellow, Jeffrey Cheah School of Medicine
and Health Sciences, Monash University Malaysia)

Assistant Professor Maria Ana B. Diaz

(Department of Anthropology, Sociology and Psychology,
University of the Philippines Baguio)

Dr. Elizabeth Jones

(Head of Department of Psychology, Jeffrey Cheah
School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Monash University Malaysia)

Dr. Myreen P. Cleofe

(University of Santo Tomas, Philippines)

Dr. Wenty Marina Minza

(Faculty of Psychology, Universitas Gadjah Mada)

Mr. Aron Harold G. Pamoso

(PhD candidate of Australian National University)

Dr. Kyle Tan

(Research Fellow, Faculty of Māori and Indigenous
Studies, University of Waikato)

Ms. Maireen Joy N. Perez

(Guidance Counselor, University of Santo Tomas, Philippines)

Dr. Angela Oktavia Suryani

(Assistant Professor, Universitas Katolik Indonesia Atma Jaya)

Dr. Maria Theresa B. Gallardo

(University of Santo Tomas, Philippines)

Dr. Joy R. Tungol

(Associate Professor, Department of Psychology,
University of Santo Tomas)

Mr. Joselito Banono Jr.

(Assistant Professor, Cebu Institute of Technology, Philippines)

Dr. Rachana Bhangaokar

(Assistant Professor, The Maharaja Sayajirao
University of Baroda)

Ms. Ker Rou Chung

(Research Assistant, Monash University Malaysia)

Dr. Justine Thong

(HELP University)

Ms. Syurawasti Muhiddin

(Psychology Study Program, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Hasanuddin)

CONTACT US

CONTACT US

For inquiries, you can also send an email to seaip2024@gmail.com